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Capstone team takes second at Stanford Design Challenge

Department of Bioengineering - Tue, 04/14/2015 - 13:28

BioE senior capstone design team of Hannah Adelsberg, Celia Cheung, Eric Katz, and Suzanne Chou took second place at the annual Stanford Design Challenge for their invention, the HandleBar. HandleBar is a ratcheting stair assist railing for older people to safely ascend and descend stairs in their homes, allowing for increased independence while still encouraging individuals to climb under their own power.

HandleBar team

The Stanford Center on Longevity Design Challenge is a global competition aimed at encouraging students to design products and services to improve the lives of older adults. In this second year, the Challenge focused on ways to motivate / empower mobility among older adults in their daily lives, both inside their homes and in their community.

Read more at Stanford.

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Lee and Murthy fight drug-resistant microbes

Department of Bioengineering - Fri, 04/10/2015 - 09:17
Professors Luke Lee and Niren Murthy are leading a team, with Dr. Riley of the School of Public Health, to develop tools to quickly spot and identify drug-resistant pathogens. Their project will receive $5.8 million over five years from the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID) as part of the agency’s effort to develop diagnostics to rapidly detect antimicrobial-resistant bacteria.
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Opinion: Seismo Blog details Bay Area quake risk

UC Berkeley Science News - Wed, 04/08/2015 - 12:19
 Seismo Blog details Bay Area quake riskIn its 100th entry since its launch in 2008, the UC Berkeley Seismology Laboratory’s “Seismo Blog” offers an up-to-date, more detailed map of earthquake risk in the larger San Francisco Bay Area.
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What happens when you put a hummingbird in a wind tunnel?

UC Berkeley Science News - Wed, 04/08/2015 - 07:00
What happens when you put a hummingbird in a wind tunnel?KQED producer Sheraz Sadiq joined UC Berkeley postdoctoral researcher Victor Ortega in Robert Dudley’s Animal Flight Laboratory to film hummingbirds in action for a “Deep Look” segment, “What Happens When You Put a Hummingbird in a Wind Tunnel?”
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Johnson and Kurpinski at WonderCon

Department of Bioengineering - Tue, 04/07/2015 - 13:30
Bioengineers Terry Johnson and Kyle Kurpinski hosted a packed panel on "Science and Science Fiction" at WonderCon 2015.
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Bioengineers mentor high school students

Department of Bioengineering - Mon, 04/06/2015 - 13:43

On April 4, over 100 students, parents, and teachers from throughout the Bay Area gathered at Stanley Hall for the second annual Bioengineering High School Competition (BioEHSC).

bioehsc groupBioEHSC, which is run by the Bioengineering Honor Society, is a 6-week bioengineering design competition aimed at high school students. This culminates in a final symposium where students share their proposals to solve pervasive medical issues using bioengineering strategies.

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New target for anticancer drugs: RNA

UC Berkeley Science News - Mon, 04/06/2015 - 07:00
 RNAUC Berkeley researchers Jamie Cate and Amy Lee have found that a subset of messenger RNAs – many of which have been linked to cancer – have unique tags that make them promising targets for anticancer drugs. These short RNA tags bind to a protein, eIF3, that regulates translation at the ribosome.
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Dudley Featured on KQED Science

Department of Integrative Biology - Thu, 04/02/2015 - 11:23

Research by Professor Robert Dudley and postdoc Victor Ortega is featured in a segment on KQED Science about Hummingbirds in a wind tunnel.

Read more...

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Calaveras-Hayward fault link means potentially larger quakes

UC Berkeley Science News - Thu, 04/02/2015 - 11:03
Calaveras-Hayward fault link means potentially larger quakesUC Berkeley seismologists have proven that the Hayward and Calaveras faults are essentially the same system, meaning that a rupture on one could trigger a rupture on the other, producing considerably larger quakes than once thought.
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200th anniversary of Tambora eruption a reminder of volcanic perils

UC Berkeley Science News - Tue, 03/31/2015 - 05:00
200th anniversary of Tambora eruption a reminder of volcanic perilsAn expert on supervolcano eruptions, UC Berkeley's Steve Self was the first modern-day scientist to visit Tambora in Indonesia, the site of the largest volcanic eruption in the past 1,000 years. On the 200th anniversary of its eruption in 1815, Self and others are warning of the ever-present dangers of volcanoes like Tambora.
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Student Has Fun Exploring Disco Clam’s Underwater World

Department of Integrative Biology - Mon, 03/30/2015 - 10:25

Lindsey Dougherty’s love of the sea eventually led her to UC Berkeley, where she is now a graduate student focusing on one of the ocean’s more unusual critters: a clam that flashes in the deep.

This behavior earned it the nickname ‘disco clam,’ and Dougherty is working with UC Berkeley’s Roy Caldwell, professor of integrative biology, to explore how and why it flashes its mirrored lips.

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Astronomers upgrade their cosmic light bulbs

UC Berkeley Science News - Thu, 03/26/2015 - 12:53
Astronomers upgrade their cosmic light bulbsType Ia supernovae allow astronomers to measure the distances to galaxies and the ever-increasing rate at which our universe is expanding. UC Berkeley postdoc Patrick Kelly has now identified the best, top-of-the-line Type Ia supernovae for measuring cosmic distances, potentially making distance cosmic measurements twice as precise as before.
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Student has fun exploring disco clam’s underwater world

UC Berkeley Science News - Thu, 03/26/2015 - 11:34
Student has fun exploring disco clam’s underwater worldLindsey Dougherty's love of the sea eventually led her to UC Berkeley, where she is now a graduate student focusing on one of the ocean's more unusual critters: a clam that flashes in the deep. In a recent interview with Discovery Canada’s science show “Daily Planet,” Dougherty talked about her love of diving and her first encounter with these unusual mollusks.
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Young bug enthusiast meets his hero, E.O. Wilson

UC Berkeley Science News - Thu, 03/26/2015 - 08:10
Young bug enthusiast meets his hero, E.O. WilsonEver since he was 5, Jasper Bagley’s idol has been E. O. Wilson, the renowned biologist, widely considered the world’s leading ant expert. On March 25, the 11-year-old insect enthusiast got to meet Wilson at UC Berkeley, where the entomologist was the keynote speaker at a conference on the national parks.
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Love national parks? Thank UC Berkeley

UC Berkeley Science News - Mon, 03/23/2015 - 14:01
Love national parks? Thank UC BerkeleyWithout UC Berkeley and its alumni, the National Park Service would not be what it is today. In fact it might not even exist. The story of the NPS's founding is detailed in California Magazine as Berkeley, 100 years after gathering alumni, scientists and other influential people for a seminal conference on parks, opens a centennial conference on the future of the parks.
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Herbicide Impacts Focus of BGSU Talk

Department of Integrative Biology - Mon, 03/23/2015 - 08:16

Dr. Tyrone Hayes, an assistant professor of integrative biology at the University of California, Berkeley, will present "From Silent Spring to Silent Night: A Tale of Toads and Men." He will discuss the harmful impacts of chemical contaminants on amphibians and humans in Bowling Green State University's 2015 Jean Pasakarnis-Buchanan Lecture Tuesday 7 p.m. in 112 Life Sciences Building on campus.

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New Lick instrument scans infrared for signals from alien civilizations

UC Berkeley Science News - Fri, 03/20/2015 - 14:38
New Lick instrument scans infrared for signals from alien civilizationsUC San Diego physicist Shelley Wright led a team that included UC Berkeley scientists Dan Werthimer and Geoff Marcy to build a sensitive infrared detector to look for laser signals from extraterrestrial civilizations. The instrument, now scanning the skies from Lick Observatory, was originally proposed by the late Charles Townes, inventor of the laser.
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Slatkin Selected to Present Martin Meyerson Faculty Research Lecture

Department of Integrative Biology - Thu, 03/19/2015 - 16:37

Professor Montgomery Slatkin has been selected by the Academic Senate to be one of two lecturers for the 2015 Martin Meyerson Faculty Research Lectures.  The lecture, titled “Population Genetics of the Neanderthal Genome Project" will take place on Wednesday April 1. 
Read More...

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Even at a molecular level, taking it slow helps us cope with stress

UC Berkeley Science News - Thu, 03/19/2015 - 10:00
Even at a molecular level, taking it slow helps us cope with stressUC Berkeley scientists have identified a new molecular pathway critical to aging. They found that by slowing down the activity of mitochondria in the blood stem cells of mice, they could enhance the cells' capacity to handle stress and rejuvenate old blood.
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Scientists urge caution in using new CRISPR technology to treat human genetic disease

UC Berkeley Science News - Thu, 03/19/2015 - 10:00
Scientists urge caution in using new CRISPR technology to treat human genetic diseaseJennifer Doudna and five other UC Berkeley scientists co-authored a commentary in the journal Science this week urging caution when using new precision DNA scissors to do gene therapy, and strongly discouraged their use to alter the human genome in ways that can be inherited. Doudna is one of the co-inventors of this technology, referred to as CRISPR-Cas9.
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