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Anderson lab develops potential molecular lock and key for GMOs

Department of Bioengineering - Tue, 06/16/2015 - 12:47
Researchers in bioengineering professor Chris Anderson’s lab have used synthetic biology to develop an easy way to lock down bacteria, to contain its accidental spread. The work, led by recent BioE Ph.D. Gabriel Lopez, shows promise as a potential method of containing advances created through synthetic biology and genetic engineering.
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Scientists use molecular ‘lock and key’ for potential control of GMOs

UC Berkeley Science News - Tue, 06/16/2015 - 04:00
UC Berkeley researchers have developed a way to put bacteria under a molecular lock and key as a way to contain its accidental spread. The method involves a series of genetic mutations that render the microbe inactive unless the right molecule is added to enable its viability.
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Why anti-depressants can make you itch

UC Berkeley Science News - Mon, 06/15/2015 - 07:48
Why anti-depressants can make you itchAnti-depressants, which prevent serotonin from being broken down, can also make people itch. UC Berkeley's Diana Bautista and Buck Institute investigators think they know why: at least in mice, there are itch receptors in the skin triggered by serotonin. The finding could lead to new anti-itch drugs.
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Amy Herr named 2015 Georges Guiochon Faculty Fellow

Department of Bioengineering - Fri, 06/12/2015 - 12:56
Professor Amy Herr has been named the 2015 Georges Guiochon Faculty Fellow! She will be presented the award and deliver a special lecture at the 42nd Symposium of HPLC (High Performance Liquid Phase Separations and Related Techniques) in Geneva.
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World’s science journalists are coming to Berkeley in 2017

UC Berkeley Science News - Fri, 06/12/2015 - 07:58
World’s science journalists are coming to Berkeley in 2017The 2017 meeting of the World Federation of Science Journalists will be held in San Francisco, co-hosted by UC Berkeley and UC San Francisco.
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Three campus researchers named 2015 Pew scholars

UC Berkeley Science News - Thu, 06/11/2015 - 11:39
Three campus researchers named 2015 Pew scholarsThree UC Berkeley early-career researchers — Polina Lishko, Ke Xu and Juan-Pablo Castillo — have been selected as this year's Pew scholars, for those showing outstanding promise in science relevant to the advancement of human health
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Three campus researchers named 2015 Pew scholars

UC Berkeley Science News - Thu, 06/11/2015 - 11:39
Three campus researchers named 2015 Pew scholarsThree UC Berkeley early-career researchers — Polina Lishko, Ke Xu and Juan-Pablo Castillo — have been selected as this year's Pew scholars, for those showing outstanding promise in science relevant to the advancement of human health
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Alumni startup Bolt Threads in Businessweek

Department of Bioengineering - Thu, 06/04/2015 - 09:01
Bolt Threads, a startup company founded by BioE PhD alum David Breslauer, is planning to revolutionize the clothing industry by spinning spider silk from engineered yeast.
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Exiled stars explode far from home

UC Berkeley Science News - Thu, 06/04/2015 - 02:00
Astronomers usually discover supernovae in large galaxies, where a star explodes perhaps once a century. UC Berkeley astronomer Melissa Graham and her colleagues discovered four exploding stars in the regions between galaxies in a cluster, three of which seem to be lonely supernovae unattached to any galaxy at all.
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Exiled stars explode far from home

UC Berkeley Science News - Thu, 06/04/2015 - 02:00
Exiled stars explode far from homeAstronomers usually discover supernovae in large galaxies, where a star explodes perhaps once a century. UC Berkeley astronomer Melissa Graham and her colleagues discovered four exploding stars in the regions between galaxies in a cluster, three of which seem to be lonely supernovae unattached to any galaxy at all.
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Messersmith shows drug-induced regeneration in adult mice

Department of Bioengineering - Wed, 06/03/2015 - 12:17
Bioengineering professor Phillip Messersmith has co-authored groundbreaking research showing that a primitive form of tissue regeneration can be harnessed to achieve spontaneous tissue regeneration in adult mice, without the need for stem cells. The study findings were reported in Science Translational Medicine.
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Get the giggles often? It may be in your DNA

UC Berkeley Science News - Wed, 06/03/2015 - 07:00
Get the giggles often? It may be in your DNAResearchers have found that a gene involved in the regulation of serotonin makes some of us more prone to spontaneous smiles and bursts of laughter. People with the short version of the gene were more likely to smile and laugh while looking at Far Side and New Yorker cartoons and humorous clips from the movie Strangers in Paradise.
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Get the giggles often? It may be in your DNA

UC Berkeley Science News - Wed, 06/03/2015 - 07:00
Get the giggles often? It may be in your DNAResearchers have found that a gene involved in the regulation of serotonin makes some of us more prone to spontaneous smiles and bursts of laughter. People with the short version of the gene were more likely to smile and laugh while looking at Far Side and New Yorker cartoons and humorous clips from the movie Strangers in Paradise.
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High hopes as Large Hadron Collider pumps protons to ever higher energy

UC Berkeley Science News - Wed, 06/03/2015 - 05:50
Physicists from UC Berkeley and around the world harbor great expectations as the world’s most powerful particle accelerator, the Large Hadron Collider in Geneva, Switzerland, officially restarts operations today at a much greater energy than ever before.
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High hopes as Large Hadron Collider pumps protons to ever higher energy

UC Berkeley Science News - Wed, 06/03/2015 - 05:50
High hopes as Large Hadron Collider pumps protons to ever higher energyPhysicists from UC Berkeley and around the world harbor great expectations as the world’s most powerful particle accelerator, the Large Hadron Collider in Geneva, Switzerland, officially restarts operations today at a much greater energy than ever before.
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U.S. bringing up the middle on gender-science stereotyping

UC Berkeley Science News - Tue, 06/02/2015 - 09:14
UC Berkeley professor Marcia Linn co-authored a study of more than 350,000 people in 66 countries showing that gender stereotyping in which men are more strongly associated with science than women is found in some unlikely countries, with the Netherlands leading the list.
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U.S. bringing up the middle on gender-science stereotyping

UC Berkeley Science News - Mon, 06/01/2015 - 16:00
U.S. bringing up the middle on gender-science stereotypingUC Berkeley professor Marcia Linn co-authored a study of more than 350,000 people in 66 countries showing that gender stereotyping in which men are more strongly associated with science than women is found in some unlikely countries, with the Netherlands leading the list.
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Poor sleep linked to toxic buildup of Alzheimer’s protein, memory loss

UC Berkeley Science News - Mon, 06/01/2015 - 07:00
Poor sleep linked to toxic buildup of Alzheimer’s protein, memory lossSleep may be a missing piece of the Alzheimer's puzzle. The toxic protein that is the hallmark of Alzheimer’s disease blocks the deepest stages of sleep, resulting in memory decline, according to new research.
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Poor sleep linked to toxic buildup of Alzheimer’s protein, memory loss

UC Berkeley Science News - Mon, 06/01/2015 - 07:00
Poor sleep linked to toxic buildup of Alzheimer’s protein, memory lossSleep may be a missing piece of the Alzheimer's puzzle. The toxic protein that is the hallmark of Alzheimer’s disease blocks the deepest stages of sleep, resulting in memory decline, according to new research.
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Q&A with Pat Crawford: How research changes food policy, politics

UC Berkeley Science News - Thu, 05/28/2015 - 08:48
 How research changes food policy, politicsResearch is the most powerful way to influence national food policy and politics, says Pat Crawford, who should know. Her research — as co-founder of the Center for Weight and Health at Berkeley, an adjunct professor of nutrition and now research director at UC’s Nutrition Policy Institute — has had a mighty influence on what we eat.
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